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ImmunoQuery 2.8 User Guide

This user guide is available for download to assist in navigating the ImmonQuery Portal

User Guide


How do I order an antibody?

To order an antibody in the Suggested Panel, click on “Add to Order” hyperlink. A green checkmark appears next to the antibody name indicating that the antibody has been added to your antibody cart. Place your cursor over the cart; notice that it will list the antibody you just selected. You may remove antibodies from your order by selecting the “Exclude this Antibody” hyperlink under the antibody name in the Suggested Panel or from the cart by clicking on the red minus sign next to the antibody name or the “remove all” hyperlink. Alternatively, on the Comprehensive Panel, you may click the icon labeled “Add to Order” to place this antibody in your cart. You may remove this antibody from your order by selecting the icon again. All antibodies in cart are listed with your laboratory’s preferred name. Select “Print Order” and the ImmunoQuery will generate a form you can print out, fill out the relevant information and attach it to your requisition and specimen bound for the lab.

What does “Show lab Ab names” mean?

Show Lab Ab Names

When running a Dx panel, you’ll notice the checkbox “Show Lab Ab Names” just above the antibody names on the left-hand side of the Comprehensive and Suggested Panels. Selecting this checkbox allows you to view antibodies in your panels with the common name used by your laboratory. You may toggle this checkbox off again to view the panels with ImmunoQuery names.

How do I use the new Smart Search feature to run a 2-Ab or 3-Ab panel?

To perform a 2-Ab query of ACTIN-SM and CYCLIN D1. Follow the steps for a single Ab search. [For instructions on running a single Ab query, please review the “Run a Single Ab Panel” tutorial.] Enter your first search term (i.e., “actin”) and select “ACTIN-SM” as Ab1. Notice that the word, “actin” is still highlighted in the search box. To enter the second antibody, simply start typing the common antibody name “cyclin” into the search box. The word “actin” will be replaced by the typed word.

Click the plusnext to “CYCLIN D1” or the name itself until it appears under the Selected ABS heading. Notice that once this antibody name has been selected a check appears next to the name in the place of the plus sign. In addition, the name “CYCLIN D1” appears under the Selected ABSheading. The info will display associated clone names for Selected ABS each selection. You may remove “CYCLIN D1” from the list by clicking the minus next to the name.

Click the red buildpanel button to run this 2-Ab query or continue reading for instructions on running a 3-Ab query.

To perform a 3-Ab query of ACTIN-SM, CYCLIN D1, and CD117. Follow the steps for a 2-Ab search. Two antibodies, “ACTIN-SM” and “CYCLIN D1” appear under the Selected ABS heading. Notice that the word “cyclin” is still highlighted in the search box. To enter the third antibody, simply start typing the common antibody class name “c-kit” into the search box. The word “cyclin” will be replaced by the typed word. [For ideas on effective keyword searches, please review our “Keyword Search” tutorial]

Click the plus next to “CD117” or the name itself until it appears under the Selected ABS heading. Notice that once this antibody name has been selected a check appears next to the name. The infowill display associated clone names of each selection.

Click thebuildpanel button to run this 3-Ab query.

What is the Ask an Expert Feature and how do I use it?

We have asked 13 acclaimed experts in their respective fields to tell us which antibodies they would run to confirm a diagnosis. The result is our new Ask an Expert feature. These customized panels offer at least 500 distinct two diagnosis and three diagnosis queries. Users compare our meta-analysis with what a world- renowned expert suggests, and ultimately improve patient care with increased diagnostic effectiveness.

In general, different bodies of knowledge are consulted when determining what antibodies will be used in a diagnosis. The Ask an Expert feature provides the pathologist with the first and only source for simultaneous viewing of empirical and evidentiary support to supplement their antibody decisions. A sample expert panel is shown below. The numbered and colored boxes correspond to a similarly numbered and colored paragraph description of each column. Briefly, the appearance of a symbol in the “Expert” column (boxes 1 and 3) indicates that a particular antibody is preferred by an expert. Plus (+) and minus (-) signs signify the reactivity attributed by the expert to a particular antibody and diagnosis combination. A yellow “caution” sign (shown in box 3) indicates special staining information or caveats attributed to that antibody/diagnosis combination. Expert information is juxtaposed with data from the meta-analysis (shown in boxes 2 and 4) for comparative purposes.

NOTE: The numbers and colored boxes in the picture correspond to the following numbered descriptions of each column of data:

1. The “Expert” column indicates with a plus (+) or minus (-) the preferred antibodies Dr. Moran uses to distinguish Lung Nonsmall Cell Carcinoma from Colon Adenocarcinoma. The + sign means that Dr. Moran attributes to this antibody a percent positivity of 60% or more for this diagnosis. A – sign represents a positivity of 40% or less. An equivocal reactivity (between 40% and 60%) is indicated by a “+/-” sign. These reactivities are assigned empirically by Dr. Moran and his lifetime of experience and may differ slightly from what is reported in the meta-analysis (shown in column 2).

2. All of the meta-analysis data for Lung Nonsmall Cell Carcinoma are available here in the “Positive,” “Cases,” and “vs.2” columns. The green arrows in the “vs.2” column indicate that, according to the meta-analysis, any of the first 4 antibodies would be appropriate to use for distinguishing Lung Nonsmall Cell Carcinoma from Colon Adenocarcinoma. Compare with Dr. Moran’s antibody selections. For these two differentials, the expert opinion and meta-analysis strongly agree.

3. The “Expert” column indicates with a + or – the preferred antibodies Dr. Greenson uses to distinguish Colon Adenocarcinoma from Lung Nonsmall Cell Carcinoma. The opposing Expert symbols across the “expert” columns indicate good differentiating antibodies for Lung Nonsmall Cell Carcinoma and Colon Adenocarcinoma (for example, CDX-2 and CK 20).

4. All of the meta-analysis data for Colon Adenocarcinoma are available here in the “Positive,” “Cases,” and “vs.2” columns. Comparing the “hard” numbers of the meta-analysis with the symbols in the expert column, one can see that the expert opinion strongly agrees with the meta-analysis.

How do I use the new Smart Search feature to run a 2-Dx or 3-Dx panel?

To perform a 2-Dx query of Colon adenocarcinoma and Mesothelia, All. Follow the steps for a single Dx search. [For instructions on running a single Dx query, please review the “Running a Single Dx Query” tutorial.] Enter your first search term (i.e., “colon”) and select “Colon adenocarcinoma” as Dx1. Notice that the word, “colon” is still highlighted in the search box. To enter the second diagnosis, simply start typing the partial diagnosis name “meso” into the search box. The word “colon” will be replaced by the typed word.

Click the plusnext to “Mesothelia, All” or the name itself until it appears under the selected dxsheading. Notice that once this diagnosis name has been selected a checkappears next to the name in the place of the plus sign. In addition, the name “Mesothelia,All” appears under the selected dxs heading. The info will display associated discrete diagnosis names of each selection and guidance on adjusting the sensitivity and minimum references of your search. You may remove “Mesothelia, All” from the selected dxslist by clicking the minusnext to the name.

Click the red buildpanelbutton to run this double diagnosis query or continue reading for instructions on running a triple Dx query.

To perform a 3-Dx query of Colon adenocarcinoma, Mesothelia, All, and Lung nonsmall cell carcinoma. Follow the steps for a double Dx search. Two diagnoses, “Colon adenocarcinoma” and “Mesothelia, All” appear under the heading. Notice that the word “meso” is still highlighted in the search box. To enter the third diagnosis, simply start typing the partial diagnosis name “nonsmall” into the search box. The word “meso” will be replaced by the typed word. [For ideas on effective keyword searches, please review our “Keyword Search” tutorial]</p>

Click the plusnext to “Lung nonsmall cell carcinoma, NOS” or the name itself until it appears under selected dxs the heading. Notice that once this diagnosis name has been selected a checkappears next to the name. The info will display associated discrete diagnosis names of each selection and guidance on adjusting the sensitivity andminimum references of your search.

Click the buildpanelbutton to run this triple dx query

How do I use the new Smart Search feature to run a single ab panel?

Perform a single Ab search of Smooth Muscle Actin. First, enter your first search term (i.e., “actin”). It can be a clone or class name. In the filtered list that is generated, find the desired antibody (shown in light blue, below). [For ideas on effective keyword searches, please review our Keyword Search post.]

To view the full alphanumeric list of antibody names in ImmunoQuery: if you prefer to search through the entire list of antibody names, click the View All link to the right of the search box. You will not need to enter any search terms into the text box.

Click the plusnext to “ACTIN-SM” or the name itself until it appears under the Selected ABS heading. To indicate that this antibody name has been selected, a check is shown next to the name.

In addition, the name “ACTIN-SM” appears under the Selected ABS heading. The infowill display associated antibody clone names the selection. You may remove “ACTIN-SM” from the selected ab list by clicking the minus next to the name.

Click thebuildpanel button to run this single antibody query.

[For information on running 2- and 3-ab queries, please review our “Run a 2-ab or 3-ab Panel” tutorial]

How do I use the new Smart Search feature to run a single Dx panel?

To perform a single Dx Search of Colon Adenocarcinoma. First, enter your first search term (i.e., “colon”). In the filtered list that is generated, find the desired diagnosis (shown in light blue, below). [For ideas on effective keyword searches, please review our “Keyword Search” tutorial.]

To view the full alphanumeric list of diagnosis names in ImmunoQuery: if you prefer to search through the entire list of diagnosis names, click the View All link to the right of the search box. You will not need to enter any search terms into the text box.

Click the plus next to “Colon adenocarcinoma” or the name itself until it appears under the selected dxs heading. To indicate that this diagnosis name has been selected, a check is shown next to the name.

In addition, the name “Colon adenocarcinoma” appears under the selected dxs heading. The info will display associated discrete diagnosis names of each selection and guidance on adjusting the sensitivity and minimum references of your search. You may remove “Colon adenocarcinoma” from the selected dx list by clicking the minusnext to the name.

Click the buildpanel button to run this single diagnosis query.

[For information on running 2- and 3-dx queries, please review our “Running a 2- or 3-dx Query” tutorial]

How do I use panel filtering?

ImmunoQuery with Custom Sync allows you to customize your ImmunoQuery panels. Four options exist to view your dx panels: no filtering (classic ImmunoQuery), lab available antibody filter, expert panel filter and both lab available antibody and expert panel filter. Below are screen shots of each activated filter with a description preceding each:

Comprehensive Panels without filtering is that of the classic ImmunoQuery featuring the Comprehensive and Suggested Panel using meta-analysis (please note that no boxes beside the word “Filter:” are checked). Along the left-hand side of the results panel, icons are shown. The presence of the icon next to an antibody name indicates that the antibody is unavailable in the hospital’s lab. Conversely, the absence of a symbol next to an antibody name identifies the antibody as available in the hospital’s lab.

When the hospital’s “Available in Lab Inventory” filter is checked the Comprehensive panel displays only those antibodies that are available in-house. All unavailable antibodies are removed.

The third and forth filters show the Ask an Expert panel for the 3-diagnosis differential panel (note the checked “Expert” box). The third filter is that of the classic Ask and Expert panel with availability icons shown down the left-hand side of the panel. The presence of the icon next to an antibody name indicates that the antibody is unavailable in the hospital’s lab. Conversely, the absence of a symbol next to an antibody name identifies the antibody as available in the hospital’s lab.

The fourth filter shows the Ask an Expert panel but, similar to the second filter, displays only those antibodies that are available in-house. All unavailable antibodies are removed.

How can I improve my diagnosis and antibody searches in ImmunoQuery®?

ImmunoQuery has a vast diagnosis list that is always growing. In order to save time and improve accuracy, several effective searching methods can be employed by the pathologist.

Acronym Search. If the desired diagnosis has a commonly known acronym, simply type in the acronym or partial acronym in the search box. The dropdown will show a list of possible matches. This case, GIST, has only one.

Partial Keyword Search. Sometimes, the most effective searching method is by partial keyword. For example, a pathologist may want to search for a diagnosis by site, i.e., the “pancreas.” Because of differing naming conventions, diagnoses involving the pancreas can include the words “pancreas,” “pancreatic,” and “pancreaticobilliary.” To capture all diagnoses involving this site, you normally would have to search the diagnosis list for all three terms and chose the best match. Instead, using the partial keyword that includes the common letters, i.e., “pancrea” will display all diagnoses in one filtered list:

A tip on use of partial keywords: Consider all alternative terms when selecting your search terms and choose letters that both words have in common, or partial keywords, when possible. For example, if a pathologist wanted to view all diagnoses that include the cell type, “Acinar Cell,” they should remember that some diagnoses may also use “Acinic Cell.” Therefore, a partial keyword of “Acin” would include both alternative names in the search results.

Caveat: Some synonyms do not have any letters in common, for example “Bladder carcinoma” and “Transitional cell carcinoma.” In these cases, the diagnosis list will need to be searched to find the preferred ImmunoQuery term.



How can I improve my antibody searches in ImmunoQuery?

Acronym and partial keyword searches. The same methods that work effectively for searching diagnosis names also work for finding antibodies. ImmunoQuery’s library of antibodies can be searched by class or clone name using acronyms (i.e., “MBP” for “Myelin Basic Protein”) or partial keywords (“kit” for “C-KIT”). Only two letters are required to initiate Smart Search.

Caveat: Some antibodies commonly have dashes in their names. ImmunoQuery names retain dashes and spaces, just as they appear in the literature. Smart Search will recognize dashes, so if initially you cannot find an antibody (i.e., you type “S100”), try searching with the dash (i.e., “S-100”).

Clone name. Similar to diagnosis names, differing naming conventions sometimes prevent quickly finding an antibody class. For example, the antibody for smooth muscle actin is sometimes known both SMA and Actin-SM. In this case it may be more effective to search ImmunoQuery by clone name. In a search for “1A4” the pathologist can quickly find ACTIN-SM.

Caveat: Although one may select a search based on clone name, all antibody results panels are reported for the class.

Elsevier